Liability Law

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How Legal Malpractice Claims Work

How Do Legal Malpractice Claims Work?

In bringing a claim for legal malpractice (professional liability), you have to show that your attorney was negligent in the handling of your case. There are a few basic components to take into account. First, you have to show that your attorney owed you a duty of care. This is often reflected by your representation or engagement agreement. However, it could also be evidenced through an implied promise such as your attorney verbally agreeing to perform a legal service that was not specified in your legal agreement.

Suing Your Attorney For Legal Malpractice

It is not beyond the realm of possibility that your attorney was negligent when representing you in your legal matter. Although attorneys are supposed to adhere to strict ethical standards while protecting the rights of their clients, in reality, some attorneys fall short – way short – in providing effective legal services. This could cause you to permanently lose your case, your money, and even your rights. Notably, a recent legal drama summarized below highlights incidents of potential attorney malpractice where clients alleged that their attorneys’ litigation antics cost them millions. Here’s more on what led to that tragedy and what you can do if you are a victim of legal malpractice.

Boy Scout Abuse Victims Please Take Notice

Time is running out to bring your claim for compensation against the BSA

Survivors of all types of abuse, committed by scout leaders, counselors and fellow scouts have until 5 p.m. Nov. 16, 2020 to file a claim for compensation  against the Boy Scouts of America to be eligible for compensation through the organization’s bankruptcy proceedings.

If you are a survivor of abuse you must file your claim before by 5 p.m. November 16, 2020 or you will be barred from filing suit against the national organization in the future.

Zoom for Lawyers – The Risks and Benefits of Legal Video Conferencing

While COVID-19 requires lawyers to become creative in our effort to move our clients cases along, in keeping with our ethical duty to zealously represent our clients, it is critical to remember that such conversations may not be considered “confidential.”   When we speak with a client or a client’s agent, such as a consulting expert, those conversations are considered confidential and protected from disclosure to our adversaries . . .

High-Speed Police Car Chases Wreck Cars and Lives

In 2008 I represented the family of three brothers who were tragically killed in a high speed police chase returning home from a Christmas pageant. The wreck resulted in four young boys losing their lives. While the Louisville Metro PD (LMPD) had recently established a stricter policy regarding the protocol used in high speed police car chases, I was able to show that they did not follow the “new” safer policy and won the case.

“Forces of opposition, bow down;” reads ad by Remmington gun manufacturers – Aug 1, 2019

This ad slogan was the basis for Connecticut Supreme Court’s holding in March 2019 that Remmington violated the laws against unfair trade practices for knowingly marketing the AR-15 to civilians for use in military-style combat. While we wait for Congress to take action to protect our children and families, skilled plaintiffs lawyers like Mr. Koskoff in Connecticut are using creative strategies to hold accountable the manufacturers of assault weapons used in the Newtown mass shooting. We can only hope for more creativity to benefit the victims of the hate-crime perpetrator in El Paso. Read the article…